Sunday, 19 November 2017

Critical Reflection on Formal Oral Presentation

My group Task Force finally did our formal oral presentation on our proposal for construction of Eco-Tree and Eco-Gallery in the future campus in Puggol. This marks near the end of this module. 

Thinking back about how i performed for my presentation, there were definitely more negative points than positive points. We were the 4th group to present so we have a lot of time to prepare. Because of this, we put in extra effort in practising for our oral presentation to better prepare ourselves since we did not receive much feedback on our mock presentation. Thus, we practised for about four to five times a day for the entire week. While practising, we were feeling confident and able to speak fluently. However, i did rather badly on the actual presentation. There was a moment where i blackout in my presentation.The feedback given by my peers and professor were that i seemed to have some lapse in remembering my lines and as the presentation progressed i was speeding up my speech due to nervousness. 

Despite my bad performance, my peers and professor lauded me for maintaining good posture and having decent pronunciation and articulation throughout my presentation. They advised me to slow down my pace and take a deep breath so that i will not feel too nervous. To aid me in remembering my details and presentation topic, i should just address the benefits and key takeaways and not tying myself to the script. i should let the information flow from my speech. 

Hearing all the feedback, i could feel that i was trying to present word by word of what i have been presenting during our practice which in turn cause me to blackout when i could not remember the exact lines.This negative trait itself has become the downfall of my presentation. Being a good presenter, confidence is one of the key factors. This gives the audience a sense of assurance that you know what you are presenting. Also, a good presenter does not need to remember his scripts. As long as he understands what he is presenting, he is able to elaborate his part of presentation freely without memorising any words. These are the 2 main points that i felt i could have did better in my presentation. 

For my future presentations in my university, i will learn to understand the context behind my presentation topic. I feel that once i am able to understand my topic well it will boost my confidence and I can avoid making the same mistakes i have made in this oral presentation. I should also continue the good habits of practising regularly so i can train to be more fluent in my presentation as well. It is always good to receive feedback from people because it allows me to know about my mistakes, learn from it and improve on myself as a person. All in all, our group presentation was considered good and i am glad that everyone's efforts have paid off. 

Sunday, 29 October 2017

Technical Report Draft 1

Introduction
Singapore is a metropolis city-state without any natural resources and heavily dependent on external trade alliances agreements to bring in natural resources to power up the city. Natural resources have always been the source of conflict between countries due to its scarcity. To overcome this situation, Singapore has been constantly investing on sustainable methods to reduce the usage for natural resource while maintaining the needs to power up the city.

As Singapore continues to prosper, our education system moves towards applied learning that encourages student to utilize technology to expedite on their full learning capability. In result, students have grown to be more dependent on technologies as it has brought comfort and convenience towards daily learning.



Technology has also influences our students to be ignorance to Singapore’s reliance of energy from other countries and the lack of education on energy-conservation that will lead to over consumption of energy, creating a potential threat to our future. While on the other hand, students have the highest influence on both the older and the future generations and by empowering them on energy-conservation will be Singapore’s key in setting future trend in energy conservation. 



Problem Statement


Students in SIT should possess basic knowledge on energy conservation techniques to benefit our campus by reducing the energy cost. However, many students lack the knowledge and awareness in terms of energy conservation, and sometimes ignorance to take the simplest action due to personal convenience. Thus, there is a need to raise awareness on energy conversation to students by educating them to reduce the usage of energy and understand climate change.



Purpose Statement

The objective of this report is to propose to SIT community to install a gallery that raises awareness about energy conservation and climate change. The gallery will be self-sustained by solar panels through utilizing the light energy emitted by the sun and converting it into electrical energy to power up the gallery. The gallery will contains information regarding to energy conservation to educate students on the importance of saving energy.

Thursday, 12 October 2017

Reader Response Draft 3

In The Straits Time article, "Dubbed 'the best in class': 6 things about Hong Kong's MTR railway system", Khaw (as quoted in Lee, 2015) commended on Hong Kong's Mass Transit Railway (MTR) and approved that its standards should be classified as the basic criterion for other countries. Lee mentioned certain facts about MTR in the article. Hong Kong's railway pricing was the highest among railway countries and the track covered a distance of 221km. Lee stated the MTR encountered significantly small number of minor delays and 37 per cent of MTRC's (Mass Transit Railway Corporation) earnings were devoted to rail track maintenance. Lee remarked that MTRC was well known for their highly efficient manpower and crowd controlling measurements such as driving a vehicle equipped with ultrasonic techniques that performed routine checks on rail track every couple of days for faults that were undetectable by human eyes. While there are many aspects that SMRT should learn from Hong Kong's MTR, it should not be designated as the 'best in class'.

Hong Kong MTR has very poor management on the passengers because it lacks enforcement on passengers' travelling ethics. According to Blundy (2016), a passenger was seen hanging a hammock on a train to take a nap. Fortunately, MTR staff were called upon to stop the man from posting further disturbance to the surrounding passengers. Although the train system is well known for their efficiency, such example has shown the poor management of it. Although Singapore's SMRT is not as efficient as MTR, SMRT has better management on their travelers. There was no similar case of passengers taking nap on hammock in the train. The management of MTR needs to implement stricter rules for the passengers to prevent unnecessary collision and crowding in the station. Passengers alighting on specific stations have the priority to exit the train first before boarding of other passengers. During peak hours, passengers tend to force their way in before allowing passengers to alight because the entering passengers wish to take up empty seats, resulting in overcrowding within the door premises and unnecessary collisions among each other. The train management crews should control the situation so that they can provide an open path for the passengers to alight without anybody in the way and allowing the boarding passengers to enter in a orderly manner. This was suggested in the article "13 bad habits people do at the MTR"(n.d.).

Hong Kong's MTR has poor handling on problem situations because it lacks advanced technologies to deal with these situations. A recent article "MTR slammed for poor handling of train service failure" claimed that 100,000 city workers were stranded in the East Kowloon region due to a power glitch in the train service. The workers took more than an hour to look for the reason behind the glitch without any technologies. MTR needed to ratify more technologies so that it could resolve problems in a shorter time and more efficient way. Khaw (2015) also commented that trains of MTR reach stations every two minutes. The consequence of the train delay could be huge if the similar accident happens again. For an efficient rail system like MTR, it is understandable that it intends to increase the passenger's fares to earn more revenues. In return, the passengers expect MTR to improve on its system as well as meeting the basic needs of the users. Thus, dissatisfaction grows when MTR takes a long time to resolve problems as passengers feel that the rail system could have provide more preventive measures or solutions to uphold their reputation as a fast and efficient system.

Although MTR has been reputed as one of the best rail way systems in the world, it should not be designated as the best instead. Being the best is not just about being efficient in normal situations but also being decisive in critical situations. It should improve on its current standard in management of passengers and problem situations to convince the world that it can be the best.



References

Blundy, R (2016, Apr 16). 10 strangest things to happen on Hong Kong's MTR. (2016). South China Morning Post. Retrieved, September 22, 2017 from http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/education-community/article/1936345/10-strangest-things-happen-hong-kongs-mtr

Lee, M.K (2015, Oct 29). Dubbed 'the best in class', 6 things to know about Hong Kong's MTR. (2015). The Straits Times. Retrieved September 15, 2017 from http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/dubbed-the-best-in-class-6-things-about-hong-kongs-mtr-rail-system

MTR slammed for poor handling of train service failure. (2017). Ejinsight. Retrieved, September 23, 2017 from http://www.ejinsight.com/20170412-mtr-slammed-for-poor-handling-of-train-service-failure

13 bad habits people do at the MTR. (N.D.). Retrieved, September 23, 2017 from https://expats.hk/273-14-bad-habits-people-do-at-the-mtr.html

Sunday, 1 October 2017

Reader Response Draft 2

In The Straits Time article, "Dubbed 'the best in class': 6 things about Hong Kong's MTR railway system", Khaw (as quoted in Lee, 2015) commended on Hong Kong's Mass Transit Railway (MTR) and approved that its standards should be classified as the basic criterion for other countries. Lee mentioned certain facts about MTR in the article. Hong Kong's railway pricing was the highest among railway countries and the track covered a distance of 221km. Lee stated the MTR encountered significantly small number of minor delays and 37 per cent of MTRC's () earnings were devoted to rail track maintenance. Lee remarked that MTRC was well known for their highly efficient manpower and crowd controlling measurements such as driving a vehicle equipped with ultrasonic techniques that performed routine checks on rail track every couple of days for faults that were undetectable by human eyes. While there are many aspects that SMRT should learn from Hong Kong's MTR, it should not be designated as the 'best in class'.

Hong Kong MTR has very poor management on the passengers because it lacks enforcement on passengers' travelling ethics. According to Blundy (2016), a passenger was seen hanging a hammock on a train to take a nap. Fortunately, MTR staff were called upon to stop the man from posting further disturbance to the surrounding passengers. Although the train system is well known for their efficiency, such example has shown the poor management of it. Although Singapore's SMRT is not as efficient as MTR, SMRT has better management on their travelers. There was no similar case of passengers taking nap on hammock in the train. The management of MTR needs to implement stricter rules for the passengers to prevent unnecessary collision and crowding in the station. Passengers alighting on specific stations have the priority to exit the train first before boarding of other passengers. During peak hours, passengers tend to force their way in before allowing passengers to alight because the entering passengers wish to take up empty seats, resulting in overcrowding within the door premises and unnecessary collisions among each other. The train management crews should control the situation so that they can provide an open path for the passengers to alight without anybody in the way and allowing the boarding passengers to enter in a orderly manner. This was suggested in the article "13 bad habits people do at the MTR"(n.d.).

Hong Kong's MTR has poor management on problem situations because it lacks advanced technologies to deal with these situations. A recent article "MTR slammed for poor handling of train service failure" claimed that 100,000 city workers were stranded in the East Kowloon region due to a power glitch in the train service. The workers took more than an hour to look for the reason behind the glitch without any technologies. MTR needed to ratify more technologies so that it could resolve problems in a shorter time and more efficient way. Khaw (2015) also commented that trains of MTR reach stations every two minutes. The consequence of the train delay could be huge if the similar accident happens again. For an efficient rail system like MTR, it is understandable that it intends to increase the passenger's fares to earn more revenues. In return, the passengers expect MTR to improve on its system as well as meeting the basic needs of the users. Thus, the dissatisfaction of the passengers grows when MTR takes a long time to resolve problems as they feel that the rail system should have made more preventive measures or solutions to uphold their reputation as a fast and efficient system.

Although MTR has been reputed as one of the best rail way systems in the world, it should not be designated as the best instead. Being the best is not just about being efficient in normal situations but also being decisive in critical situations. It should improve on its current standard in management of passengers and problem situations to convince the world that it can be the best.




References

Blundy, R(2016, Apr 16). 10 strangest things to happen on Hong Kong's MTR. (2016). South China Morning Post. Retrieved, September 22, 2017 from http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/education-community/article/1936345/10-strangest-things-happen-hong-kongs-mtr

Lee, M.K (2015, Oct 29). Dubbed 'the best in class', 6 things to know about Hong Kong's MTR. (2015). The Straits Times. Retrieved September 15, 2017 from http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/dubbed-the-best-in-class-6-things-about-hong-kongs-mtr-rail-system

MTR slammed for poor handling of train service failure. (2017). Ejinsight. Retrieved, September 23, 2017 from http://www.ejinsight.com/20170412-mtr-slammed-for-poor-handling-of-train-service-failure

13 bad habits people do at the MTR. (N.D.). Retrieved, September 23, 2017 from https://expats.hk/273-14-bad-habits-people-do-at-the-mtr.html


Edited 05 Oct 2017
Edited 09 Oct 2017
Edited 12 Oct 2017

Saturday, 23 September 2017

Reader Response Draft 1

In The Straits Time article, "Dubbed 'the best in class': 6 things about Hong Kong's MTR railway system", Khaw (as quoted in Lee, 2015) was full of commendations on Hong Kong's Mass Transit Railway (MTR) and approved that the standards of MTR should be classified as the basic criterion for other countries. There were certain facts about MTR mentioned in the article. Hong Kong's railway pricing is the highest globally and the track of MTR covers a long distance of 221km. In terms of fault occurrence, the MTR encounters a significantly small number of minor delays. Furthermore, 37 per cent of MTRC's earnings were devoted to the rail maintenance. In addition, MTRC is well known for its highly efficient manpower and crowd control measures such as driving a vehicle equipped with ultrasonic techniques to perform routine checks on the long track every couple of days for flaws that are not detectable with human eyes. While many countries have certain areas of aspect to learn from Hong Kong's MTR, it should not be designated as the best in class.

First of all, Hong Kong MTR has very poor management on the passengers. In the article "10 strangest things to happen on Hong Kong's MTR", Blundy (2016) stated that a passenger was seen making a anchorage on a train to take a nap. Fortunately, MTR staff were called upon to stop the man for posting disturbance to the train. Although the train system is well known for its efficiency as mentioned in the article "Dubbed the 'best in class', 6 things to know about Hong Kong MTR rail system", such example has proved the poor management side of it. Despite not being as efficient as MTR, Singapore's SMRT has better management on its travelers. At the very least, there were no cases of passengers hanging a hammock in the train. Secondly, the management of MTR needs to implement stricter rules for the passengers to prevent serious collision and crowding in the station. During peak hours, passengers tend to rush in and out of the train doors for work. Passengers who alight on the specific stations should have the priority to get out of the train first before the ones that want to board on the train. There are times people will force their way in before the alighting passengers because they wish to take up empty seats which result in crowding on the door and unnecessary collisions among each other. With proper management crews to control the situation, they can create an open path so that the passengers can alight without anybody in the way and let the boarding passengers enter in a much orderly manner. This can be further supported in the article "13 bad habits people do at the MTR"(n.d.).

Lastly,  it was said in a recent article "MTR slammed for poor handling of train service failure" that approximately 100,000 city workers were stranded in the East Kowloon region due to a power glitch in the train service. Hong Kong's MTR has ultrasonic techniques that are used to detect faults in the railway system. However, the workers decided to look for the reason behind the glitch with naked eyes and it was outrageous that they took more than an hour finding it. They should have ratified more technologies so that when problems occur they can resolve it in a significantly shorter time. Khaw (2015) commented that trains of MTR reach stations every two minutes. Given that the same incident happens again, we can hardly imagine how many trains are being delayed in an hour's time. For an efficient rail system like MTR, it is understandable that the passenger's fares are increasing so that it can earn more revenue. In return, the MTR has to improve on its system as well to meet the satisfaction of the passengers. That is why when problem occurs and MTR takes a long time to resolve it, the dissatisfaction grows as they feel that the rail system has not made much preventive measures or solutions to uphold their reputation as a fast and efficient system.

Although MTR has been reputed as one of the best rail way systems in the world, it should not be designated as the best instead. Being the best is not just about being efficient in normal situations but also being decisive in critical situations. It should improve on its current standard in management of passengers and problem situations to convince the world that it can be the best.




References

Dubbed 'the best in class', 6 things to know about Hong Kong's MTR. (2015). The Straits Times. Retrieved, September 15, 2017 from http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/dubbed-the-best-in-class-6-things-about-hong-kongs-mtr-rail-system#xtor=CS1-10

10 strangest things to happen on Hong Kong's MTR. (2016). South China Morning Post. Retrieved, September 22, 2017 from http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/education-community/article/1936345/10-strangest-things-happen-hong-kongs-mtr

13 bad habits people do at the MTR. (n.d.). Retrieved, September 23, 2017 from https://expats.hk/273-14-bad-habits-people-do-at-the-mtr.html

MTR slammed for poor handling of train service failure. (2017). Ejinsight. Retrieved, September 23, 2017 from http://www.ejinsight.com/20170412-mtr-slammed-for-poor-handling-of-train-service-failure/

Edited 28 September 2017

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Summary - Draft 1

In The Straits Time article, "Dubbed 'the best in class': 6 things about Hong Kong's MTR railway system", Khaw (as quoted in Lee, 2015) was full of commendations on Hong Kong's Mass Transit Railway (MTR) and approved that the standards of MTR should be classified as the basic criterion for other countries. There were certain facts about MTR mentioned in the article. Hong Kong's railway pricing is the highest globally and the track of MTR covers a long distance of 221km. In terms of fault occurrence, the MTR encounters a significantly small number of minor delays. Furthermore, 37 per cent of MTRC's earnings were devoted to the rail maintenance. In addition, MTRC is well known for its highly efficient manpower and crowd control measures such as driving a vehicle equipped with ultrasonic techniques to perform routine checks on the long track every couple of days for flaws that are not detectable with human eyes. While many countries have certain areas of aspect to learn from Hong Kong's MTR, it should not be designated as the best in class.

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Summary on "Best in Class"

In the Straits Time article, "Dubbed 'the best in class': 6 things about Hong Kong's MTR rail system", Khaw (as quoted in Lee,2015) was full of commendations on Hong Kong's Mass Transit Railway (MTR) and the standards of MTR should be classified as the basic criterion for other countries. There were certain facts about MTR mentioned in the article. Firstly, Hong Kong's railway pricing is the highest globally and the track of MTR covers a significantly longer distance of 221km while SMRT only covers 162km. In terms of fault occurrence, the MTR encounters lesser minor delays as compared to SMRT. Furthermore, it was mentioned in the article that 37 per cent of MTRC's earnings were devoted to the rail maintenance. The article stated that only 19 per cent of the SMRT's earnings were provided for the maintenance on its railway system. Lastly, MTRC is well-known for its highly efficient manpower and crowd control measures. The total number of staffs stand at 5,800 and they perform routine checks on the long track of the railway system every couple of days, displaying their high level of work ethics. Whenever they go on their checks, a vehicle equipped with ultrasonic techniques will be drove along the track to spot for flaws that are not detectable with human eyes. Singapore on the other hand only executes its maintenance check on nearly a week basis, which revealed its lack of efficiency and effectiveness correlated to MRTC. A high-tech control center named Super Operations Control Center (OCC) operated by MRTC provides counter measures or useful solutions when problem occurs.

Edited 21 September 2017

Critical Reflection on Formal Oral Presentation

My group Task Force finally did our formal oral presentation on our proposal for construction of Eco-Tree and Eco-Gallery in the future camp...